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CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR 2021 SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS!

Damien Thompson, Kaherokwakeron
Akwesasne Mohawk Nation

Damien Thompson

Damien will be attending Paul Smith's College in Fall 2021, studying Environmental Science. He would like to become an environmental scientist, environmental engineer, or a conservationist for his people and community. Since the 1980's, his tribe has done a lot of work to restore the environment after factories polluted their lands and waters, making people and animals sick. This is where his passion to study environmental science started. Damien is a traditional singer and hunter. These traditions have helped him understand the importance of his peoples’ natural connection to our earth.


Kai Whitmore, Inupiaq Eskimo
Native Village of Noatak Tribe

Kai Whitmore

Kai lives above the Artic Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska. His community has almost 3,000 residents and you can only get there by airplane. Many rely on traditional foods like fish, caribou, moose, seal, and berries. Community involvement and learning his Inupiaq culture is very important to Kai. He loves to hunt, fish, boat and camp. 

Kai will be attending Washington State University. His dream is to become a teacher and give back to his community. “Teaching is one of the most important jobs in the world”, says Kai. He wants to be a part of something that makes a difference beyond high school and college. As a teacher, he hopes to inspire and mentor his people and other Alaska Natives to follow their dreams.


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NativeVision staff and coaches are producing videos to virtually engage youth. Mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual health remain important -- follow along for weekly video updates! 

 

NativeVision

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NativeVision is a unique national youth enrichment and empowerment initiative for Native American children, operated by the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health. Launched in 1996 in partnership with the NFL Players Association and the Nick Lowery Charitable Foundation, more than 40,000 Native youth and tribal community members from dozens of tribes across the country have been reached to date.

Native American youth living on reservations today suffer the poorest health, socioeconomic and educational status of any racial or ethnic group in the country, with the highest rates of suicide, obesity, diabetes, high school dropout, substance abuse and poverty. NativeVision is a strengths-based program to overcome these challenges.

NativeVision began as a summer sports and life skills camp, bringing together Native youth with former college and professional athletes who volunteered as mentors and coaches. It has evolved into a comprehensive year-round program, including:

  • Six camps throughout the year, held during school breaks,
  • An in-school and after-school curriculum that promotes nutrition, physical activity, healthy lifestyles and the pursuit of education through an activity-based, experiential curriculum, and
  • Community events promoting fitness and nutrition.

Local NativeVision project coordinators implement the year-round curriculum and community outreach, and partner with volunteer local and national coaches to lead the camps. The curriculum and program materials have been developed over many years by Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health in partnership with tribal communities. The curriculum materials and technical assistance are available for replication by other tribal communities and programs, with the overarching goal to strengthen and inspire the next generation of Native American leaders.

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Kids' Dreams

NativeVision teens on the Navajo Nation share their vision for the future.


Inside Lacrosse podcast about NativeVision, featuring Martin Sheen


 

 

CONTACT: For more information, please contact Marlena Hammen, NativeVision Program Coordinator at mhammen@jhu.edu or 443-287-5167.

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Photos on the Native Vision website courtesy of Ed Cunicelli.
ed cunicelli/photographer inc.
p.o. box 86
glen mills, pa 19342
ewc@cunicelli.com



 

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR 2021 SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS!

Damien Thompson, Kaherokwakeron
Akwesasne Mohawk Nation

Damien will be attending Paul Smith's College in Fall 2021, studying Environmental Science. He would like to become an environmental scientist, environmental engineer, or a conservationist for his people and community. Since the 1980's, his tribe has done a lot of work to restore the environment after factories polluted their lands and waters, making people and animals sick. This is where his passion to study environmental science started. Damien is a traditional singer and hunter. These traditions have helped him understand the importance of his peoples’ natural connection to our earth.


Kai Whitmore, Inupiaq Eskimo
Native Village of Noatak Tribe

Kai lives above the Artic Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska. His community has almost 3,000 residents and you can only get there by airplane. Many rely on traditional foods like fish, caribou, moose, seal, and berries. Community involvement and learning his Inupiaq culture is very important to Kai. He loves to hunt, fish, boat and camp. 

Kai will be attending Washington State University. His dream is to become a teacher and give back to his community. “Teaching is one of the most important jobs in the world”, says Kai. He wants to be a part of something that makes a difference beyond high school and college. As a teacher, he hopes to inspire and mentor his people and other Alaska Natives to follow their dreams.

    

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